Innovating hyper-accurate cancer treatments

UQ paving the way for new hyper-accurate cancer treatments: An Australian-first research and manufacturing hub at The University of Queensland will lead the design and development of the next-generation of treatments for cancer patients.

The newly created Australian Research Council Hub for Advanced Manufacture of Targeted Radiopharmaceuticals (AMTAR) will become a one-stop-shop for experts and industry to innovate and streamline emerging radiopharmaceutical technologies.

 

Professor Kris Thurecht from UQ’s AIBN.

Hub director, Professor Kris Thurecht from UQ’s Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and Centre for Advanced Imaging, said AMTAR would cement Australia’s place at the cutting edge of medical innovation and pave the way for manufacturing a new generation of cancer treatments.

“Targeted radiopharmaceuticals are a group of drugs that deliver radiation therapy directly to cancer cells and can spare the body from the harsh effects of cancer treatment,” Professor Thurecht said.

“Australia is already recognised as an incubator of innovation in the biotechnology sector and now UQ has an amazing opportunity to be at the forefront of development and innovation for more of these medical devices.”

Created through a $5 million Australian Research Council grant and more than $10 million from partners, AMTAR will innovate and discover across the radiopharmaceutical field, to ensure new technologies can be produced, manufactured and readied for market.

“While the medical technology is still emerging, radiopharmaceuticals represent a multi-billion-dollar industry that is integral to modern healthcare,” Professor Thurecht said.

“There is a significant commercial opportunity where we can enhance the Australian biotechnology sector by manufacturing these products locally and create more jobs for the future.”

AMTAR is a collaboration between UQ, the University of Sydney and multi-national radiopharmaceutical industry partners.

The hub will also feature contributions from Monash University, The University of Nottingham, and University of Tokyo, as well as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre in the US.

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