1.) Aluminium and autism

Does human exposure to aluminium have a role to play in autism spectrum disorder (ASD)? Research at Keele University published in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology provides the strongest indication yet that aluminium is an aetiological agent in ASD. The aluminium content of brain tissues from 5 donors who died with a diagnosis of ASD was found to be extraordinarily high, some of the highest values yet measured in human brain tissue. Why for example, would the occipital lobe of a 15 year old boy with autism be 8.74 (11.59) micrograms/g dry wt., a value which is at least 10 times higher than might be considered as acceptable for an aged adult never mind a child?
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2.) Why everyone should drink silicon-rich mineral water

UK tap water contains very low levels of dissolved silicon or silicic acid (more often referred to as silica), which is unfortunate for the nation’s health. I think everyone should drink silicon-rich mineral water every day to remove toxic aluminium from their bodies and brains.
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3.) Aluminium adjuvants in vaccines

How do you express a legitimate concern about aluminium adjuvants in vaccines without being labelled as ‘anti-vaccine’? We are studying the role and efficacy of aluminium adjuvants used in vaccines. We have been researching the impact of aluminium on life for more than 30 years and we are applying this experience to our understanding of aluminium adjuvants and how they work in vaccines.
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4.) Hacked off by the adenovirus

Every year, thousands of people in the UK get a bout of cold, (which is not the same as influenza), but can still leave you feeling unwell for 7-10 days. This year, there seems to be a particularly nasty version doing the rounds – the Queen has only just recovered after weeks of staying indoors at Sandringham – and it seems to be widespread in the community. In fact, I have only just recovered from the virus myself after three weeks feeling dreadful.
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5.) First aid in a terrorist age

Would you know what to do if you were first on the scene of a terrorist outrage where dozens of people were injured and dying? ‘There is a well known phenomenon called the ‘bystander effect’, where everyone does nothing because they assume someone else knows what to do,’ says Joe Mulligan, head of First Aid education at the British Red Cross. ‘Don’t fall for that. Call the emergency services and do something to help.’ All the research we have done shows that the first people on the scene are absolutely crucial to the outcome for the victim. Read

6.) Swiss move to ban aluminium in antiperspirants

The Swiss are worried about the role that antiperspirants, and specifically aluminium salts in antiperspirants, may play in breast cancer, and they have taken steps to do something about it. On Tuesday the 5th of May 2017 their National Council (Conseil National) voted by 126 to 58 to approve a bill (postulat) that the Federal Council (Conseil Fédéral) effectively should consider banning the use of aluminium salts in antiperspirants and commission research to establish their role in breast cancer. According to the Green MP, Lisa Mazzone, who brought the bill to the National Council, there is now sufficient doubt about the safety of aluminium salts in antiperspirants to assert the precautionary principle to their continued use.
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7.) Strong evidence linking Aluminium and Alzheimer’s

There has been a strong link between human exposure to aluminium and the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease for half a century or more. However, without definite proof, there is still no consensus in the scientific community about the role of this known neurotoxin in this devastating brain disease.
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8.) A role for aluminium in multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating disease of the central nervous system and affects approximately 100,000 individuals in the United Kingdom. The cause of MS is unknown and is likely to involve genetic and environmental factors as well as lifestyle choices. There is no cure for MS and current therapies are limited and primarily address the symptoms of the disease.
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