Love Island and the morals of plastic surgery

The TV programme dominating screens up and down the country this summer is Love Island. The ITV2 show was the surprise smash hit of last summer and has proved just as popular this year.

But the beautiful young people who are trying everything in their power to win the £50,000 first prize have throw up some interesting questions about modern society.

And one of the major ones is the merit, and even morals, of plastic surgery. A number of the contestants have revealed they have undergone cosmetic procedures. Some have had breast augmentations, some cheek fillers and others lip enhancers. A number of them have been open about it, while others have kept their cards closer to their chests.

But their ubiquitous appearance on the media – which includes extensive interviews on This Morning as well as their pictures splashed all over the press and social media – has thrown up a bit of a backlash against plastic surgery.

But their ubiquitous appearance on the media – which includes extensive interviews on This Morning as well as their pictures splashed all over the press and social media – has thrown up a bit of a backlash against plastic surgery.

A recent YouGov survey found that eight per cent of women aged 18 to 30 they polled said they had considered a breast enlargement after watching Love Island. And many critics are quick to slam the contestants soaking up the sun the in Majorca for going under the knife.There has also been criticism of adverts around the show plugging clinics and weight loss supplements.

‘Body shaming’ is a buzz term in today’s world. It has been used a lot since Love Island’s return.

I fully appreciate the concern parents may have over what their impressionable sons and daughters are watching. But I think it is important to make it clear that any cosmetic surgeon or clinic worth their salt would not let such factors determine the suitability of would-be patients.

At my clinic – based in Wimpole Street, London – we employ a thorough process through consultations to ascertain why individuals want to have a certain procedure and to make sure they are suitable. We ask them a host of questions and encourage them to talk candidly about any issues they are facing. This is vital to ensure that everything is in place for a successful and beneficial outcome.

Amidst the hubbub surrounding TV programmes such as Love Island, it is sometimes forgotten that people have cosmetic surgery for very valid reasons – not just to copy those they see in the public eye. For example, if someone loses their self-confidence due to the appearance of a particular part of their body it can have a devastating effect. They can become withdrawn, see their relationships suffer and not lead the life they should be leading.

So as long as they are approaching any cosmetic procedure – either surgical or non-surgical – with the view that they are doing it for themselves and no-one else, I feel it should be considered a legitimate choice.

I firmly believe life is there to be lived and if a cosmetic procedure helps you do that, it is totally up to you.
It’s all about being happy in your own skin and educating people – especially youngsters – that they have to find their own path in life.

Christopher Inglefield

Christopher Inglefield is a a highly experienced Consultant Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeon and Medical Director of London Bridge Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Clinic.
He is a member of the UK Association of Aesthetic Surgeons, World Professional Association for Transgender Health, British Burn Association, the British Microsurgical Society, the British Association of Surgical Oncology and the Royal Society of Medicine – Plastic Surgery.
Christopher Inglefield
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